Carnival Mind

I like to write, drink coffee, stare at the moon, play with cats, and let life take me on a carnival ride.

Daylight slides a blade
across the thin membrane
divorcing sun from moon.

I try to get him to stop.

In this brief spell,
this is where my lungs cave.

Nightfall pulls the curtain down
along the stage
and all the players evaporate.

I imagine myself dancing
on the ceiling; the stars applaud
my grace. This is real.

These are the things
which cannot be seen.

Deep blues and the absence
of light chaperone the dreams
I know will not make it through

when daytime claws his way
through folds of orange,
red, and gold.

I can breathe inside a shadow,
but I won’t bloom where usual
things will blossom.

M.S.

89cats:

(by da-bu-di-bu-da)

A note to all women:

18. September 2014

National Voter’s Registration day is on September 23, and as women, it is absolutely critical that those of us who are able to vote do so.

If we aren’t voting, we are doing a disservice to the hundreds of women before us who paved the way for us to be able to have our political freedoms.

Our mothers and grandmothers, not even 90 years ago, fought relentlessly for women’s suffrage. America’s women were expected to remain “silent” during wartime in everything that did not involve supporting our troops and the Commander in Chief. As Woodrow Wilson took office in January of 1917, demonstrators took up position outside the White House holding round-the-clock vigils demanding the right to vote for women.

Women like Alice Paul and Lucy Burns aimed to confront the president and expose the hypocrisy of “making the world safe for democracy” when there wasn’t even true democracy on their home front.

City officials began to arrest these women. Soon they were beaten, kicked, charged for “obstructing” traffic, pinched, gagged, choked, and insulted. These women were considered suffragist traitors and they were imprisoned with retched conditions. Forced to eat rancid food, drink from dirty buckets of water, and remain in their cells, these heroes endured pain and fear in order to give women across America a better life. These ladies were lifted into the air and flung to the ground, while one was stabbed in between the eyes with the broken staff of her banner.

Less then two weeks later, a court-ordered hearing exposed these women to the world. The judge then agreed they had been terrorized for nothing more than exercising their political right to protest. Because these women were HUMANS. With HUMAN rights.

Three years later, women gained the right to vote which means that we, today, as women, have the ability to vote for the officials we want to run our cities, states, and our government.

Please, do not take this privilege lightly. If you are old enough to vote, do it. We can’t take for granted what the brave women before us have done for us to be able to have the political freedom of suffrage. Whatever race you are, however old you are, and no matter what political view you hold, please remember that your voice matters. A few women doing a lot of things will not be the ones to change our lives, but a lot of women making small, progressive steps will be the ones to rock the world. All over again.